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Archive for April, 2014

P4270040Bud Light – the King of Beer Litter

First I need to say that when doing sophisticated empirical research one has to pay attention to the size of the sample.  The 42 cans I found by the side of Asby Road during the annual springtime trash pick-up is 66% as many as I found last year.  The plastic bottle count (7) is 58% of last year’s.  And the glass  bottles (11)  only 38% of last year’s haul. 

Does this mean there was less littering this winter, and if so, what would account for the change?  Or perhaps it means one of my neighbors (I suspect Phyllis or Greg) beat me to the discards.  Maybe there were some cans and bottles hidden in the crusts of snow that still clung to the shaded north side of the road. 

In any case, Bud Light still carries a significant lead in both the can and glass bottle categories with 33% of the cans and 73% of the bottles.  The Anheuser Busch family of beer again displayed a stellar performance in overall litter with 57% of all cans and 82% of bottles.

2013 2014
CANS
Bud Light 30 14
Bud 5
Michelob 2
Other Anheuser Bush 11 3
Coors Light 8
Twisted Tea 6
Miller 2
Pabst 1
Coke 1
Other 23
Total Cans 64 42
GLASS BOTTLES
Bud Light 14 8
Bud 1
Other Anheuser Busch 2
Sierra Nevada 1
Harpoon 1
Other 13
Total Glass Bottles 29 11

It’s hard to draw conclusions.  While the % of Bud Light cans dropped, the % of Bud Light bottles went up.  Does this indicate that those who drink Bud Light in P4270041 bottles are becoming more likely to litter?  Of does the drop in total litter indicate a rise in conscientiousness among beer drinkers?  And what are we to make of this year’s impressive showings for Coors Light and Twisted Tea?  Will these brands threaten Bud Light in future years?

And as asked following last year’s census, are we measuring the beer-drinking habits of litterers or the littering habits of beer-drinkers?  We’re sure someone in Anheuser Busch’s marketing department has the answer, but we have yet to hear from them.2014 04 012 asby rd 002

A few words about other litter are in order.  As usual, we picked up some plastic bottles.  This year we also found five 1-quart paint cans.  Any theories out there?

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Albert Parsons and August Spies were hung in 1887. Joe Hill was shot by a firing squad in 1915. Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti were electrocuted in 1927. Their methods of execution were different, but their “crimes” were common: they were put to death because of their staunch advocacy for the rights of working people to decent wages and working conditions.

The application of the death penalty has always been political – from the Salem Witch trials to New Hampshire’s Attorney General using a death penalty prosecution in her election campaign to yesterday’s verdict by an Egyptian judge that condemned 683 people to death.  (See statement from Amnesty International.)

With International Workers Day, a day that began in honor of Albert Parsons and August Spies, four days away, this is as good a time as any to recall why the cause of labor should be tied to the movement for an end to the death penalty.

Parsons and Spies were leaders of the International WorkingHaymarketRiot-Harpers.jpg People’s Association in Chicago, which was fighting for the eight-hour day. They had already been singled out for condemnation by city leaders, Parsons even threatened with lynching by Chicago businessmen, when they led the planning of a peaceful rally at Haymarket Square on May 1, 1886.

Three days later Parson, Spies, and Sam Fielden, also a member of the Working People’s Association, spoke at another rally, peaceful as well until it was rushed by club-wielding police and then shattered by an explosion.

Eleven people, including seven police officers, died. No one knew who had brought or thrown the bomb, but Spies and Parsons – who was with his wife and two children at a nearby saloon when the bomb went off – were immediately blamed.

In the words of Richard O. Boyer and Herbert M. Morais, authors of Labor’s Untold Story, “the nation’s press was a unit in declaring that it made no difference whether Parson, Spies, or Fielden had or had not thrown the bomb. They should be hanged for their political views, for their words and general activities and if more trouble makers were given to the hangman so much the better.” The Chicago Tribune, for example, said the labor leaders should be “held, tried and hanged for murder.”

And that’s exactly what happened, despite the lack of any evidence tying them to the bombing or the deaths of the police officers. “The trial was conducted with all the sensation histrionics, all the stage properties which so often transform American legal proceedings into lurid public spectacles,” according to Boyer and Morais, who added, “the verdict was almost a formality.”

This May Day, let’s remember Albert Parsons and August Spies and pledge to end the government’s option to execute those it decides are its enemies.

[Thanks to Wikipedia.org for graphics.]

The last words of Albert Spies

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2014 04 12 bernie sanders nhiop 001

Senators from opposite ends of the political spectrum took to lecterns on opposite ends of Manchester yesterday to test the waters for potential presidential runs.  At the NH Institute of Politics at Saint Anselm College, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders engaged in spirited  back-and-forth with 200 progressive activists on topics including campaign finance, excessive military spending, and the need for a “political revolution.”  Meanwhile, the Americans for the Prosperous Foundation and Citizens United hosted a parade of right-wing Senators and others trying out their stuff before an audience of several hundred conservatives at the Executive Court.  2014 04 12 freedom summit 005

Outside the conservative event, progressive activists – mistakenly identified with the Democratic Party by the Concord Monitor – held signs lambasting proposals to weaken retirement security.  

It was perhaps the first in what will soon be a typical day on the trail to the 2016 New Hampshire Presidential Primary.  

The conservative event was tickets-only, but I got my request in early enough to get a seat and hear speeches from leaders of Citizens United and Americans for the Prosperous, followed by NH Senator Kelly Ayotte, Senator Mike Lee, Do2014 04 12 freedom summit 008cropnald Trump, and a couple of local pols.  While Trump was entertaining, audience response to Senatorial speeches about low taxes and the evils of Obamacare drew tepid responses.  The speakers were ushered to the stage from behind a curtain, gave their prepared speeches, and disappeared again behind the curtain without taking any audience questions or comments.  

Senator Kelly Ayotte, who seems to be on lots of lists of potential VPs, quoted former Governor Meldrim Thomson, equated freedom with low taxes, and equated the Affordable Care Act with freedom’s opposite.  Applause were somewhere south of excited. Senator Lee was teacherly and likewise failed to excite the crowd. 

Trump was different.  Speaking without notes – and criticizing politicians who  depend on speech-writers and tele-prompters – Trump wandered from point to 2014 04 12 freedom summit 028 point, some of which departed from standard AFP scripts.  For example, he defended Social Security and Medicare in an apparent dig at proposals coming from Congressman Paul Ryan.  He said we need “to come up with a humane solution” to the country’s immigration system, but then drew applause for ridiculing Jeb Bush’s recent “act of love” statement and said he could build a physical barrier that would keep immigrants out.  Trump said we had spent $2 trillion on the Iraq war, “for what?,” but then implied maybe it would have been worth it if we had taken2014 04 12 freedom summit 020 over the country’s oil. 

With no candidate Q&A, the event was rather boring.  My colleague Addy and I left during the introduction of Congressman Louie Gohmert and headed across town.

Senator Sanders had already finished his speech and was talking about Harry Truman when we arrived at the Institute of Politics.  The mood felt different, and it wasn’t just that we were in politically comfortable surroundings.  The seats were all filled, except for ones emptied by people standing in line to get their turns at microphones on the left and right sides of the stage.  Sanders handled questions comfortably, clearly at home in a town hall meeting environment.  Decrying “a Congress largely dependent on corporate 2014 04 12 bernie sanders nhiop 011 money,” Sanders called for development of a grassroots movement to demand change and then hold politicians accountable.  

Sanders, a socialist who ran as an Independent and caucuses with the Democrats, is giving active consideration to a presidential run without saying whether he would run as an Independent or take the fight inside the Democratic Party.  “Somebody has got to be talking about these issues,” he told a group of labor activists who met with him in a small conference room after the main event. 

We could have returned to the Freedom Summit and perhaps would have been able to hear Senators Rand Paul and Ted Cruz, but I had had enough for one day.  I would have liked to hear Senator Paul criticize corporate welfare at a Koch-fueled forum.  But I’m pretty sure all these wannabe Presidents will be back, as will the progressive protests, grassroots activists, and the reporters who love to take it all in. 

 

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